Call

CALL for PROVERBS!!


1. GLOBAL CALL

We are collecting cultural metaphors akin to the two distinguished in our title – Two Shoes, Many Hats. These metaphors derive from two different sayings, in Japanese (“Nisoku no Waraji wo haku”, “Wearing two pairs of Waraji [straw sandals]”) and in English (“To wear many hats”), respectively. These expressions mean essentially the same thing – to have or hold multiple responsibilities – but use different metaphors.

Please help us to collect international expressions, from ANYWHERE in the world, that are similar in meaning to these – i.e. meaning-specific and metaphorically-variable – for the development of a work as part of the TSMH Museum at the Nothing To Declare exhibition in Manila.

DO YOU HAVE AN EXPRESSION FOR SAYING “TO HAVE / TO HOLD MANY RESPONSIBILITIES” IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE???

send proverbs >> GLOBAL CALL

 

2. LOCAL CALL

We are looking for idioms, figures of speech, sayings, and proverbs from any language in the Philippines, which illustrates a certain sentiment in a metaphoric way. Impossible to be exhaustive, our collection is particular and varied. We seek ANY Philippines’ expression that uses a metaphor to describe something simple, and we will include expressions submitted in their native language and/or translated into English. For instance, from some expressions in English:

“It is raining cats and dogs.” (Animal metaphors)

“She made it by the skin of her teeth.” (Body metaphors)

“If you can’t take the heat get out of the kitchen.” (Location metaphors)
send proverbs >> LOCAL CALL

 

The TSMH Proverb Museum and related works point to the act of translation, and more specifically, to the act of trying to translate. It is this act of trying to understand difference in which TSMH finds value and a world of possibility for a Museum on to itself. Through a series of events and workshops we, artists and community participants, will we show that despite the historical, cultural or literary reasoning from which these idioms derive, visuality – the visual image conjured in the mind – plays an integral, albeit sometimes ridiculous, role in memorizing proverbs and in giving entry into learning more about them culturally.

 

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